Author Topic: All Purpose Music Discussionne  (Read 3669 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Sprague Dawley

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 393
  • Fences: 0
    • View Profile
All Purpose Music Discussionne
« on: May 03, 2018, 02:41:35 PM »
I am a mental
« Last Edit: May 12, 2018, 05:33:36 PM by Sprague Dawley »
"We are here on earth to fart around and don't let anyone tell you different."
-K.Vonnegut

manuelmarrero

  • Administrator
  • Jr. Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 80
    • View Profile
Re: All Purpose Music Discussionne
« Reply #1 on: May 03, 2018, 11:41:34 PM »
I didn't listen to anything new in 2017-18 except rap. But much of that shit's great. I used to have all the Terminals' LPs but sold all my good records for quick
scratch and the indelible lesson that building an encyclopedic music library was the only reason I had fun between 2010-2016. Nothing else to add except Mekons rule and I'm alwayshappy to see love for their post-70s singles.

manuelmarrero

  • Administrator
  • Jr. Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 80
    • View Profile
Re: All Purpose Music Discussionne
« Reply #2 on: May 04, 2018, 11:42:58 AM »
"The Quality of Mercy is not Strnen" is great. The following s/t one is even better. Confused why Fear and Whiskey is in your top wants...

Yeah, it was solid income but I think I just spent it on something frivolous. Favorite Terminals + of the most discomfiting record covers is https://www.discogs.com/Terminals-Disconnect/release/775625

manuelmarrero

  • Administrator
  • Jr. Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 80
    • View Profile
Re: All Purpose Music Discussionne
« Reply #3 on: May 04, 2018, 11:47:00 AM »
Used to have some Chrome too...fantastic band. Didn't know you were into metal. Big hell yeah to Neurosis "Through Silver in Blood."

manuelmarrero

  • Administrator
  • Jr. Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 80
    • View Profile
Re: All Purpose Music Discussionne
« Reply #4 on: May 05, 2018, 01:22:14 AM »
It's your body that likes or doesn't like something.

Sprague Dawley

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 393
  • Fences: 0
    • View Profile
Re: All Purpose Music Discussionne
« Reply #5 on: May 13, 2018, 05:17:27 PM »
aliexpress.com over the ditch in China has some slick band shirts. Free shipping to Japan. Sketchy as hell though. Probably made of budgie skin. Order size 3XL and the cunts fits like a youth medium


"We are here on earth to fart around and don't let anyone tell you different."
-K.Vonnegut

Sprague Dawley

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 393
  • Fences: 0
    • View Profile
Re: All Purpose Music Discussionne
« Reply #6 on: May 13, 2018, 05:17:45 PM »

"We are here on earth to fart around and don't let anyone tell you different."
-K.Vonnegut

Sprague Dawley

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 393
  • Fences: 0
    • View Profile
Re: All Purpose Music Discussionne
« Reply #7 on: May 13, 2018, 05:19:32 PM »

"We are here on earth to fart around and don't let anyone tell you different."
-K.Vonnegut

Sprague Dawley

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 393
  • Fences: 0
    • View Profile
Re: All Purpose Music Discussionne
« Reply #8 on: May 13, 2018, 05:19:49 PM »
"We are here on earth to fart around and don't let anyone tell you different."
-K.Vonnegut

Sprague Dawley

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 393
  • Fences: 0
    • View Profile
Re: All Purpose Music Discussionne
« Reply #9 on: May 13, 2018, 05:21:00 PM »
"We are here on earth to fart around and don't let anyone tell you different."
-K.Vonnegut

Sprague Dawley

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 393
  • Fences: 0
    • View Profile
Re: All Purpose Music Discussionne
« Reply #10 on: May 13, 2018, 05:28:26 PM »
"We are here on earth to fart around and don't let anyone tell you different."
-K.Vonnegut

Sprague Dawley

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 393
  • Fences: 0
    • View Profile
Re: All Purpose Music Discussionne
« Reply #11 on: May 13, 2018, 05:32:29 PM »
"We are here on earth to fart around and don't let anyone tell you different."
-K.Vonnegut

Sprague Dawley

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 393
  • Fences: 0
    • View Profile
Re: All Purpose Music Discussionne
« Reply #12 on: May 13, 2018, 05:36:12 PM »
"We are here on earth to fart around and don't let anyone tell you different."
-K.Vonnegut

Sprague Dawley

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 393
  • Fences: 0
    • View Profile
Re: All Purpose Music Discussionne
« Reply #13 on: May 13, 2018, 05:37:57 PM »
"We are here on earth to fart around and don't let anyone tell you different."
-K.Vonnegut

Sprague Dawley

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 393
  • Fences: 0
    • View Profile
Re: All Purpose Music Discussionne
« Reply #14 on: June 05, 2018, 05:04:01 PM »
Barely keep up with new music and, judging by this, it seems the future of music was annulled long ago, we're currently living in the past, have been for a while, a musical past which we now think of as the present. I fucking knew it.
This article outlines what I've kind of been suspecting but didnt know how to formulate in my tiny brain

http://thequietus.com/articles/13004-mark-fisher-ghosts-of-my-life-extract
Quote
It was through the mutations of popular music that many of those of us who grew up in the 1960s, 70s and 80s learned to measure the passage of cultural time. But faced with 21st Century music, it is the very sense of future shock which has disappeared. This is quickly established by performing a simple thought experiment. Imagine any record released in the past couple of years being beamed back in time to, say, 1995 and played on the radio. It’s hard to think that it will produce any jolt in the listeners. On the contrary, what would be likely to shock our 1995 audience would be the very recognisability of the sounds: would music really have changed so little in the next seventeen years? Contrast this with the rapid turnover of styles between the 1960s and the 90s: play a jungle record from 1993 to someone in 1989 and it would have sounded like something so new that it challenged them to rethink what music was, or could be. While 20th Century experimental culture was seized by a recombinatorial delirium, which made it feel as if newness was infinitely available, the 21st Century is oppressed by a crushing sense of finitude and exhaustion. It doesn’t feel like the future. Or, alternatively, it doesn’t feel as if the 21st Century has started yet. We remain trapped in the 20th century.

The slow cancellation of the future has been accompanied by a deflation of expectations. There can be few who believe that in the coming year a record as great as, say, the Stooges’ Funhouse or Sly Stone’s There’s A Riot Goin’ On will be released. Still less do we expect the kind of ruptures brought about by The Beatles or disco. The feeling of belatedness, of living after the gold rush, is as omnipresent as it is disavowed. Compare the fallow terrain of the current moment with the fecundity of previous periods and you will quickly be accused of ‘nostalgia’. But the reliance of current artists on styles that were established long ago suggests that the current moment is in the grip of a formal nostalgia, of which more shortly.

It is not that nothing happened in the period when the slow cancellation of the future set in. On the contrary, those thirty years has been a time of massive, traumatic change. In the UK, the election of Margaret Thatcher had brought to an end the uneasy compromises of the so-called postwar social consensus. Thatcher’s neoliberal programme in politics was reinforced by a transnational restructuring of the capitalist economy. The shift into so-called Post-Fordism – with globalization, ubiquitous computerization and the casualisation of labour – resulted in a complete transformation in the way that work and leisure were organised. In the last ten to fifteen years, meanwhile, the internet and mobile telecommunications technology have altered the texture of everyday experience beyond all recognition. Yet, perhaps because of all this, there’s an increasing sense that culture has lost the ability to grasp and articulate the present. Or it could be that, in one very important sense, there is no present to grasp and articulate any more.

Consider the fate of the concept of ‘futuristic’ music. The ‘futuristic’ in music has long since ceased to refer to any future that we expect to be different; it has become an established style, much like a particular typographical font. Invited to think of the futuristic, we will still come up with something like the music of Kraftwerk, even though this is now as antique as Glenn Miller’s big band jazz was when the German group began experimenting with synthesizers in the early 1970s.

Where is the 21st-century equivalent of Kraftwerk? If Kraftwerk’s music came out of a casual intolerance of the already-established, then the present moment is marked by its extraordinary accommodation towards the past. More than that, the very distinction between past and present is breaking down. In 1981, the 1960s seemed much further away than they do today. Since then, cultural time has folded back on itself, and the impression of linear development has given way to a strange simultaneity.

Two examples will suffice to introduce this peculiar temporality. When I first saw the video for the Arctic Monkeys’ 2005 single ‘I Bet You Look Good on the Dancefloor’, I genuinely believed that it was some lost artifact from circa 1980. Everything in the video – the lighting, the haircuts, the clothes – had been assembled to give the impression that this was a performance on BBC2’s ‘serious rock show’ The Old Grey Whistle Test.

Furthermore, there was no discordance between the look and the sound. At least to a casual listen, this could quite easily have been a post punk group from the early 1980s. Certainly, if one performs a version of the thought experiment I described above, it’s easy to imagine ‘I Bet You Look Good On The Dancefloor’ being broadcast on The Old Grey Whistle Test in 1980, and producing no sense of disorientation in the audience. Like me, they might have imagined that the references to ‘1984’ in the lyrics referred to the future.

There ought to be something astonishing about this. Count back twenty-five years from 1980, and you are at the beginning of rock and roll. A record that sounded like Buddy Holly or Elvis in 1980 would have sounded out of time. Of course, such records were released in 1980, but they were marketed as retro. If the Arctic Monkeys weren’t positioned as a ‘retro’ group, it is partly because, by 2005, there was no ‘now’ with which to contrast their retrospection. In the 1990s, it was possible to hold something like Britpop revivalism to account by comparing it to the experimentalism happening on the UK dance underground or in US R&B. By 2005, the rates of innovation in both these areas had enormously slackened. UK dance music remains much more vibrant than rock, but the changes that happen there are tiny, incremental, and detectable largely only by initiates – there is none of the dislocation of sensation that you heard in the shift from Rave to Jungle and from Jungle to Garage in the 1990s. As I write this, one of the dominant sounds in pop (the globalised club music that has supplanted R&B) resembles nothing more than Eurotrance, a particularly bland European 1990s cocktail made from some of the most flavourless components of House and Techno.

Second example. I first heard Amy Winehouse’s version of ‘Valerie’ while walking through a shopping mall, perhaps the perfect venue for consuming it. Up until then, I had believed that ‘Valerie’ was first recorded by indie plodders the Zutons. But, for a moment, the record’s antiqued 1960s soul sound and the vocal (which on a casual listen I didn’t at first recognize as Winehouse) made me temporarily revise this belief: surely the Zutons’ version of the track was a cover of this apparently ‘older’ track, which I had not heard until now? Naturally, it didn’t take me long to realise that the ‘sixties soul sound’ was actually a simulation; this was indeed a cover of the Zutons’ track, done in the souped-up retro style in which the record’s producer, Mark Ronson, has specialised.

Ronson’s productions might have been designed to illustrate what Fredric Jameson called the ‘nostalgia mode’. Jameson identifies this tendency in his remarkably prescient writings on postmodernism, beginning in the 1980s. What makes ‘Valerie’ and the Arctic Monkeys typical of postmodern retro is the way in which they perform anachronism. While they are sufficiently ‘historical’-sounding to pass on first listen as belonging to the period which they ape, there is something not quite right about them. Discrepancies in texture – the results of modern studio and recording techniques – mean that they belong neither to the present nor to the past but to some implied ‘timeless’ era, an eternal 1960s or an eternal 80s. The ‘classic’ sound, its elements now serenely liberated from the pressures of historical becoming, can now be periodically buffed up by new technology. It is important to be clear about what Jameson means by the ‘nostalgia mode’. He is not referring to psychological nostalgia – indeed, the nostalgia mode as Jameson theorises it might be said to preclude psychological nostalgia, since it arises only when a coherent sense of historical time breaks down. The kind of figure capable of exhibiting and expressing a yearning for the past belongs, actually, to a paradigmatically modernist moment – think, for instance, of Proust’s and Joyce’s ingenious exercises in recovering lost time.
Jameson’s nostalgia mode is better understood in terms of a formal attachment to the techniques and formulas of the past, a consequence of a retreat from the modernist challenge of innovating
cultural forms adequate to contemporary experience.
"We are here on earth to fart around and don't let anyone tell you different."
-K.Vonnegut